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Sage Creek

by Steve Eshom on July 2, 2013

This entry is part 4 of 6 in the series CMR Photo Freight 2013

As railfans know there are a few iconic locations where rail lines, scenery, and structures converge into unprecedented scenes.  For the Central Montana this iconic location falls beween the Hoosac tunnel and the Danvers elevators.  It is a bit of a remote spot where nothing more than a few rattlesnakes and cattle live.  Its name is Sage Creek.  The highlights of this location are of course the 1700′ long Sage Creek trestle and the nearly two mile long sweeping S curve on either side.  Add in Montana’s “Big Sky” and this spot unbeatable.

Arriving Sage Creek

 

The eastbound excursion train descends the 1% grade from Hoosac tunnel towards Sage Creek.

On the south side of Sage Creek mother nature built a viewing platform to end all platforms.  The hills which define the canyon are covered only in grass and are easy to negotiate for an ideal photographic position.  No matter what your taste I think you can find a spot on that hill which will make you smile.  For our excursion Jay and Carla worked together to put the train in various spots so everyone could have that perfect photo.

Sage Creek

Our excursion train parks in the middle of one of the beautiful railroad scenes in Montana.

On the return to Denton we stopped on the north side of the trestle for another photo shoot.  This time we set up much closer to the trestle which gives you the idea just how big it really is.

Sage Creek

Our excursion train is dwarfed by the massive Sage Creek trestle.

With a scene as giant as the S curve and trestle at Sage Creek I think  a 110 car grain train would be much more appropriate for an excursion.

 

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Overtaken

by Steve Eshom on May 22, 2013

Last weekend I attended the annual GorgeRail railroad slideshow in The Dalles, OR.  I took Friday off with plans of railfanning a bit prior to the show on Saturday.  BNSF and UP had other ideas with both railroads shutting down by 9:30am for maintenance.  BNSF worked projects at Cooks and Bates while UP just seemed to run out of trains.  By mid-afternoon trains began to move again which would set me up for the photos I planned around dark (more on that in a later post).

I found myself in downtown The Dalles as the sun began to sink.  I stationed myself on E 1st. street waiting for a westbound M-HKFI to finish their work at The Dalles yard.  While I waited an eastbound grain train approached and I captured this image as it overtook me on the city street.   What a fun place to sit and watch the trains roll by!  I ended up seeing 4 in a matter of a couple of hours at this location.

Overtaken

 An eastbound empty grain train rolls through downtown The Dalles, OR.  E 1st street parallels Union Pacific’s
track #2 through about 1/2 mile of this part of town and makes for a great place to sit and enjoy the action.

Saturday’s shows were engaging, entertaining, and very enjoyable.  I particularly enjoyed David Lange’s Up Close and Personal show which featured his unique perspective on railroad photography.   His show focused on images from his viewpoint and I will say he doesn’t shoot wedgies!  I found each of the shows contained a photographic gem. I saw several in the Rob and Austin Jacox show and a couple in Steve Carter’s review of the Spokane area.  Steve’s show particularly struck me for how he added drama to a couple of images by making the appear to move by revealing more and more of the lit area of the photograph.  Very engaging presentation.  Aaron Hockley’s presentation on train porn was a wonderful after lunch reflection on railfan photography garnering many laughs for the parallels to adult themes.  Scott O’Dell presented some very unique perspectives from the Seattle Sub including many photo locations I’d never been too before.  Martin Burwash and Charles Lange provided shows which gave a wonderful historical perspective to their subjects.  I believe the highlight though was Stathi Pappas’ talk on the world of tourist railroads.  After listening to him you really have to respect the successful tourist railroads which continue to operate.  It is a tough business and I think Stathi has a great insight on where the industry is at and what a railroad has to do to be in the game long term.

Look for more images and updates from the GorgeRail weekend in future dogcaught posts.

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Diminutive

by Steve Eshom on April 17, 2013

Constant change is the rule in Vancouver.  Last week when I visited the depot looking down the alley next to the Great Western Malting elevator was nearly impossible.  The scrapper near the depot had piles of scrap and equipment which blocked the view.  The next week rail cars blocked the way.  This week construction had moved moved the scrap out of away so for the first time in several years I was able to capture an image of Great Western’s plant switcher.

The Port of Vancouver renewed the track recently so concrete ties, fresh ballast. and a renewed surface now replace the track which previously was pretty rough.  A new set of automatic switches with switch indicators control the crossover between the tracks.   Instead of just 6 cars they now pull 12 to dump.   All good changes to improve the flow of business.

The fact remains though that the building structures still tower over the trains here.  Despite all of the changes, the trains remain diminutive.

I’ve been away from blogging for a bit.  Over the last month or so I’ve worked on several personal photography projects and have just taken a break.  As time permits and my projects wrap up I will certainly be posting again.

Diminutive

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Trains and Flowers

by Steve Eshom on June 20, 2012

It amazes me every time I arrive in the dry, arid portions of the Columbia River Gorge and find flowers.  My mind always associates flowers with more moist conditions.  How wrong my mind is!

When I visited Maryhill in mid-May the Arrowleaf buckwheat and the various balamroots were in full bloom.  I spent the day hanging out with friends at this curve west of Maryhill and with the variety of rail traffic I was able to capture several of the flowers along with the train traffic.  Since these flowers are such a stark contrast to the sagebrush and usual vegetation out here I couldn’t resist.

My favorite from this cloudy day, is this image of a westbound coal train passing through the rocks west of Maryhill.  Not only is there a wonderful flower in the foreground but the rock cut is peppered with even more!

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Gorgeous Day In The Gorge

by Steve Eshom on June 14, 2012

I feel like I sound like a broken record because I’m starting another post with “another trip to the Gorge”.  I guess I shouldn’t whine too much because not everyone can easily visit such a wonderful place on a regular basis.  I should feel proud to be able to start off another post with “another trip to the Gorge”, right?

Sunday’s trip to the fabulous Columbia River Gorge was an opportunity to hang out with a friend visiting from Wisconsin.  Scott previously lived in Oregon so he wanted to spend the day hanging out in one his favorite places.   With sunrise scheduled for 5:18 we decided to leave Scott’s hotel at 5 and find some trains in the morning sun.

Our first stop coincided with the eastbound morning Z train making a meet with a grain train at Cooks.  This location was right on the eastern edge of the morning low clouds hanging around the west side of the mountains.  In the minutes before the Z train’s arrival the scene migrated from full sun to cloudy.  Of course just before the train arrived the sun disappeared altogether.   Thankfully the sun came back just enough to highlight the subject and give me this wonderful photo.

Throughout the rest of the day we visited Rowland Lake, West North Dalles, MP 99 on the UP, the Lyle rest area and associated rock out croppings,  the rock spires at MP 81.5 on the BNSF, and finally Rowland Lake again.  In the middle of the day we stopped in for a nice lunch in The Dalles and relaxed while the trains took a break and the sunlight was less than optimal.  The middle part of the day had plenty of lulls so we engaged one another in interesting conversations ranging the gamut of rail related topics as well as technology, science, and some politics.

Near the end of the day we found ourselves at Rowland Lake again.  BNSF lined up 2 trains to head right into the sun so we found our various locations around the lake for photographs.  I chose to capture this photo of the evening Z train between the Oak trees.  Now, before you say “wow, you had great luck with the barge and tow boat Steve”, understand this is a composite photo.  The barge passed through the scene about 9 minutes prior to the Z train.  I felt the combination depicts what actually happens quite frequently on the Columbia River so I chose to put the two images together.

That’s it for this Gorge visit.  Someone else approached me about a July or August trip so it looks like “another trip to the Gorge” is in store!

 

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